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MINIS 3

WEEBISCUIT’S LITTLE TEA CUP – 2008

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T. C. was out of our black and white stallion Indy and our Grand Champion mare, Lucy.  She was another knockout little filly, and of course she had those fabulous blue eyes!

T. C. at aobut a week old, with her dam, Lucy.
T. C. at abut four days old, with her dam, Lucy.

 

She is about 5 weeks old in this pic, and has had her first bath and clip.
She is about 5 weeks old in this pic, and has had her first bath and clip.

 

T. C. in the pasture with her mom.
T. C.  in the pasture with her mom.

 

T. C. as a yearling. For some reason this pic makes her coat and mane look brown. Her coat is quite black and her mane is a brownish black.

T. C. and her mom, Lucy, were brought into the dry lot outside the barn, and off pasture, a few minutes before letting the other horses in. Love to see them running! T. C. is about three weeks old.

 

The very short  clip below is T. C. in the pasture. I’m trying to get a video of her moving, but she’s more interested in coming up to me to see what I’m doing.

T. C. as a yearling. For some reason this pic makes her coat and mane look brown, but they are actually black.

WEEBISCUIT’S PHANTOM MEDICINE MAN – 2009

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This little stallion had the most beautiful dished face , and blue eyes, of course! Phantom didn’t stay with us too long. He was sold as a breeding stallion right after he was weaned, at 5 months. He went to Iowa.

Phantom had a lovely dished face, which is desirable in miniature horses.
Phantom had a lovely dished face, which is desirable in miniature horses.

 

Phantom had the coloring as his dam, Annie.
Phantom had the same coloring as his dam, Annie.
WEEBISCUIT’S KICK START – 2009

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Kicks was another gorgeous stallion, out of our mare Lucy and our stallion Rambo. Kicks was a “medicine hat.”   There was always something I liked about this boy. He always was a bit shy.  When we decided to stop breeding horses, Kicks was one of the four we kept. We had him gelded, although he was another stallion who could have been used for breeding or shown.

Just a little over three weeks old. His mother, Lucy, is by his side.
Almost 4 weeks old. His mother, Lucy, is by his side.

In the video below he’s just four weeks old. Lucy was always an incredible mother. She always stuck to her foals. Annie, another of our brood mares (on Minis 1 page), seemed to be very lackadaisacal after her foals were a few weeks old.

 

Kick's "shield" can be clearly seen on his chest.
Kick’s “shield” can be clearly seen on his chest.

 

I always loved Kick's long neck.
I always loved Kick’s long neck.
WEEBISCUIT’S UP IN SMOKE – 2009

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Smokey also has blue eyes, but they are a darker blue than the white-bodied horses.

Here's Smokey at a few weeks old. I'd given him a partial clip on the face, chest, and withers. With the young foals it's always better to do half one day and half the other day as they get too antsy.
Here’s Smokey at a few weeks old. I’d given him a partial clip on the face, chest, and withers. With the young foals it’s always better to do half one day and half the other day as they get too antsy.

The short video below shows Smokey with the partial clip in the photo above. It’s always amazing how they look once you get that baby fuzz off them!

 

Finally got him all clipped!
Finally got him all clipped!

A few moments of Smokey in the pasture with the other horses.

 

Smokey as a yearling.
Smokey as a yearling.

 

Since we decided to stop breeding, Smokey was one of the four horses we wanted to keep because he was so small. We had him gelded.
Since we decided to stop breeding, Smokey was one of the four horses we wanted to keep because he was so small. We had him gelded.
WEEBISCUIT’S SUMMER SURPRISE – 2010

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We called her Summer “Surprise” because she was a surprise! Her damn, Annie, had been bred the previous year a few times. When fall came around and she didn’t go back into heat we had the vet come and take blood for a pregnancy test (as we do on all our mares). Annie came back negative. All winter, spring, and early summer we waited for Annie to come back into heat and she didn’t. We were worried there was something wrong, but in late June she began looking very fat! She was always a fat-looking mare, but she just seemed heftier. On July 10 I felt her belly and could swear I felt a foal moving. Then I never felt movement again. But on July 22, we went to the barn and there was this little filly, standing up and nursing from her mom! Since we’d lost the first foal that we’d expected from Annie, (after we brought her home and she had it the next morning), we were pretty lucky things went so well without being monitored!

Summer was all white except for a patch of black on her left ear and below it. She didn't qualify as a medicine hat since only one ear was colored. The inside of the other ear was black, but not the outside.
Summer was all white except for a patch of black on her left ear and below it.  She didn’t qualify as a medicine hat since only one ear was colored. The inside of the other ear was black, but not the outside. She had blue eyes, though!

 

She was a cute little thing, but those all-white horses were so difficult to keep clean-looking!
She was a cute little thing. She has a head and neck clip here.

 

She was just about a year old here. She was sold to a farm in Ohio a week later.
She was just about a year old here. She was sold to a farm in Ohio a week later. Those horses with a lot of white were sure hard to keep looking clean!

We always enjoy taking our horses to the nursing homes and senior centers! We’d try to do the Senior Assisted Living Center in the morning and the nursing home in the afternoon. Since we always bathed and then clipped the horses on the morning before our visits, it was easier to do both in one day, while they were clean!

Ittybit, the first mini we ever owned, paying attention to a gentleman at the Senior Living Center.
Ittybit, the first mini we ever owned, paying attention to a gentleman at the Senior Living Center.

 

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Journey at the Senior Living Center.

 

Tango at the Senior Living Center.
Tango at the Senior Living Center.

 

 

A few ladies enjoying Tea Cup.
A few ladies enjoying Tea Cup.

The couple petting Ozzie in the photo below and Soldier in the photo below this one were just crazy about our minis. They couldn’t believe how tame and friendly they were! They wanted their senior assisted-living home to get one as a mascot!

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When people couldn't make it outside, we brought the minis into their rooms! The staff at both the nursing home and the senior living center were always more than eager to take the lead ropes and walk the minis around!
When people couldn’t make it outside, we brought the minis into their rooms! The staff at both the nursing home and the senior living center were always more than eager to take the lead ropes and walk the minis around!

 

This man was very ill. When we brought Ozzie in to see him he was so amazed at how friendly and soft he was. He put his hand on Ozzie's face and said, "He's just like a little angel horse." As soon as he finished saying that, Ozzie reached his head out and put his nose right on the man's pillow! It brought tears to my eyes, and I'm so angry with myself for not having the camera ready!
This man was very ill. When we brought Ozzie in to see him he was so amazed at how friendly and soft he was. He put his hand on Ozzie’s face and said, “He’s just like a little angel horse.” As soon as he finished saying that, Ozzie reached his head out and put his nose right on the man’s cheek! It brought tears to my eyes, and I’m so angry with myself for not having the camera ready!

In the fall the Head Start class would come to our barn on field trips. Usually there would be a few parents along as chaperones, and they seemed to enjoy the horses as much as the kids!

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We never had to worry about our horses when the kids were around. The horses are very “people-oriented.” The foals were constantly handled from birth, so they grew up very easy to handle and quite used to people. A group of 3 and 4 year olds can be quite noisy and boisterous, but we never worried about our horses having a negative reaction.

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In addition to the Head Start Field Trips,  the group that runs the Adults with Disabilities program would send out a worker with a few clients. The lady in the photo is blind, so she depended on her hands to get a “feel” for the horse. She kept saying how small it must be!

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We have also taken our horses to area elementary schools, but I lost my photos of those events! We never EVER charge anyone or any institution for bringing our horses to them or allowing them to come to our barn. It is our privilege to be able to share these wonderful animals with our community. Seeing the smiles on the faces of the people we visit is the best compensation we could have!

HORSES COMING IN FROM PASTURE AUG 2009

We always bring our horses into the barn at night, summer and winter.  We felt that by bringing them in, rather than letting them stay out in the pasture, they would be tamer and more used to people. We brought the two big horses in first and got them in their stalls. Then the minis would come in.  They have always known where their stalls are, and go right into them, but a few of the horses always had to snoop around a bit first, to the amusement of the big horses.

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